Vergil, Aeneid 1.1-33

I sing of warfares and a man, who firstly, exiled by fate,
came from the coasts of Troy to Italy and to Lavinian shores,
he much thrown by lands and by sea by the power of the gods,
because of the remembered anger of savage Juno,
also having endured much war, until he might found a city,
and bring his gods to Latium; whence, a Latin kind,
and Alban fathers, and the bulwarks of high Rome will come.
Muse, recall to me the reasons, by what injured power,
or grieving what has the queen of the gods driven
a man marked with respect to piety to turn such a fall,
to undergo such labors. Are such angers to the celestial hearts?

There an ancient city (the Tyrian settlers held it)
was Carthage, by far opposite Italy and the Tiber’s banks,
wealthy of works and most sharp of war in respect to their zeal,
which Juno is said to cultivate alone by the more than all lands,
Samos having been held to less esteem. Here were her arms,
here was her chariot; the goddess, if the fates allow such,
even yet cherished this kingdom and intends it to be for her people.
But truly she had heard that a progeny was being brought from the blood
of the Trojan leader which once might overturn Tyrian citadels;
Hence a people will come, rulers wide and superior in respect to war
for the death of Libya; thus unroll the fates.
Juno, fearing this, and mindful of the ancient war,
which firstly she had waged at Troy for her beloved Argives—
nor yet have the causes of her anger and have her savage griefs
fallen from her heart; it remains deep in her mind, the remote judgement
of Paris, and the injury to her slighted form,
and the hated kind, and the taken honors of Ganymede:
further incensed by this, she did keep the Trojans,
thrown through the entire sea, survivors of the Greeks
and of hateful Achilles, by far from Latium, and
through many years they did wander, led by fate around all seas.
It was of such difficulty to found the Roman kind.

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